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Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat
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  • English name
    Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat
  • ClassificationMarsupialia, Vombatidae
  • Scientific nameLasiorhinus krefftii

Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat
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The Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat lives in a dry harsh environment. They are on the brink of extinction because they must fight for their food with domesticated animals such as sheep and cows.

Size & Weight (Adult)

Body length: Male 102.1 cm / Female 107.3 cm
Tail length: 5 cm
Weight: Male 30.1 kg / Female 32.5 kg

(Source: Doubutsu Sekai-isan* Red Data Animals Kodansha) (*World Animal Heritage)

Where they live

The Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat lives only in the Epping Forest National Park in eastern Australia.

What they eat

They like to eat grass.

What they are like

The Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat raises its children inside its own pouch. Unlike kangaroos, this pouch is attached to the Wombat's rear end.

Find out more about the Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat!

Fighting over food with domesticated livestock...
The Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat was discovered in the late 19th century. When they were discovered in their dry and harsh environment, they were already a small population. To make matters worse, the number domesticated livestock set out to pasture increased in the 20th century. This caused the Wombat population to drop even more as they could not compete against the grass-eating sheep and cow.

Slow recovery in progress!
Today, their only habitat is the Epping Forest National Park in eastern Australia. However, there is good news. Earnest preservation activities at this national park have helped the Wombat recover its population, slowly but surely. At one time, their number fell to an all-time low of about 30 individuals, but thanks to the installation of fences that keep domesticated animals from entering, there are now more than 100 in existence.

Reference

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