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  • English name
    Malleefowl
  • ClassificationGalliformes Megapodiidae
  • Scientific nameLeipoa ocellata

Yellow-crested Cockatoo
Click the image to expand

The Malleefowl is a bird with a strange habit. They bury their eggs in a mound to keep the eggs warm. The Malleefowl is in danger of going extinct because they have been losing the places where they live and because they have been hunted by animals that humans have brought from outside of their continent.

Size & Weight (Adult)

Body length: 60 cm

(Source: Doubutsu Sekai-isan* Red Data Animals Kodansha) (*World Animal Heritage)

Where they live

The Malleefowl only lives in certain places in the south and south-west parts of Australia. They live in forests surrounded by low trees.

What they eat

The Malleefowl loves to eat seeds, fruits, shoots, and flowers. Sometimes they also eat insects and mushrooms.

What they are like

A Malleefowl egg must be kept warm for about 9 weeks before it hatches. Compared to other birds that are about the same size, this is a very long time. So, hatchlings have already grown quite big and strong when they leave their eggs. Hatchlings can fly and search for food all by themselves on the day that they are born!

Find out more about the Malleefowl!

Malleefowls do not sit on their eggs. Instead, they bury their eggs in a mound to keep them warm.
The Malleefowl is a bird that lives in Australia. Normally, birds sit on their eggs to keep them warm with their own body heat. Birds in the family Megapodiidae do not sit on their eggs. To keep their eggs warm, they put them inside a mound (which is like a tiny mountain) that they make out of fallen leaves and dirt. The fallen leaves rot, which makes the heat that is used instead of the bird's own body heat. The female lays many eggs over more than half a year starting in the spring. At the same time, the male keeps working on the mound. For example, he adds and removes dirt so that the middle of the mound stays the same temperature.

The Malleefowl is losing the places where it lives and is being hunted by foxes and cats.
These days, the Malleefowl is in danger of going extinct. The biggest problem is that it has been losing the places where it lives because of expanding farm land. Also, the Malleefowl is often hunted by foxes and cats that humans have brought from outside of the continent of Australia. People have begun protection activities, such as by making roads for the Malleefowl between the separated places where they live. However, their numbers haven't recovered yet. People have to continue performing these protection activities.

Reference

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  • Part4 "Deforestation - building roads destroys animals"
  • Part6 "Non-native species?! Abandoned pets cause environmental destruction??"

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